Thursday, October 2, 2014

As Springsteen Said

It's TonyN here and have to say first a big thank you to Adam at the Horns yesterday who made my visit that much easier. Great to have a place with a disabled toilet and even if I have to get the wheelchair in via the side entrance it was a nice feeling getting out. Was also good to remind myself of why I still write this blog even if it is not as often as I would like but more often than I would hope. Whilst meeting with friends a discussion arose and hence you are going to get my understanding of why strip clubs are beneficial to women! I can hear a rad fem or two choking on their skinny latte over that.

The benefits are two fold and I want to first visit something that is uniquely British so to speak because of the no contact rules in the pubs and clubs. In the immortal words of Bruce Springsteen "You can look but you better not touch". So how does this help women in general? Fairly obvious really is the need for self control, the hands down by the side or behind the chair or under the backside the fact is there is no physical contact allowed. I know when I first started to go to the strip pubs my hands were a lot less self controlled but with current regulation guys are learning greater self control. Obviously this doesn't apply to everyone and I am sure that it takes a little time for the lesson to sink in. Imagine a kid in a sweet shop (candy store for american readers) being told he can look at all the wonders but he is not allowed to touch any of them. The level of self control that guys are now under in clubs is probably benefiting in other aspects of life just that no one has ever tried to quantify it. I know that some people will not want to believe that guys are capable of learning to control their desires and urges but if you think of the reduction in rape in Newquay and Camden it does ask questions that scientists are better qualified to answer than this blogger.

Secondly guys who go to strip clubs are less likely to objectify women. And I can hear the cat calls about this one but with over 20 years experience in clubs I can promise you that this is a truth that no one has spoken of. Sure when you first meet a dancer there is a level of objectification but seriously how long can you deny the dancer's humanity? They live, breathe, work and do the same things as so many others and apart from a stigmatised job they are no different to any other person you would meet. So from initial objectification there is a shift into the recognition of humanity and the treatment of the dancer as a person. When the lesson learnt about this in the clubs is applied to the outside world you find guys who are much better at relating to women and accepting them. If you think that I can move from objectification to acceptance in a minute or two even the woman I am talking to is in lingerie then you realise that guys who go to clubs are much more likely to accept women as equals. The power dynamic within pubs and clubs is swings and roundabouts but there is always the level of being unobtainable that the dancer always has because there is never any contact.

I guess the key factor is the interaction between dancer and customer, the initial attraction is not a sustainable commodity and some of the best dancers I have ever met relied much more on their personality and humanity than on looks. The ability to accept men in all shapes and sizes is a wonderful thing and dancers never see my wheelchair first, in a lot of ways it only registers when I can't get into the private dance area. I can't speak for every customer but I will say that objectification of a human being fails the moment you start talking to them and accepting them as a human being.

So clubs teach us control and to bypass objectification which is surely amongst the goals of the feminists? Perhaps if they champion the clubs we would see more benefits rather than the bitter disagreements we have now.

TonyN (tonyprince@acdcfan.com)

12 comments:

  1. Tony, your kitchen sink - or rather, pub table - analysis reminded me a little of this article:

    http://www.elephantjournal.com/2014/01/naked-women-changed-my-life-10-unexpected-lessons-i-learned-from-strippers/

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    1. I look at that and realise that there are so many life lessons that people could benefit from but instead people with narrow minds and the inability to allow others freedom to choose find it difficult to accept any other view than their own.

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    2. It also has to be said that most prohibitionists seem to base their views on fixed ideologies, rather than real life experiences.

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    3. It's a terrible thing when someone is given all the information they need to make a rational decision on a subject and yet when their arguments become invalid they refuse to change their opinion. For me I accept there are issues with the industry that need to be addressed and improved but for all that closing them is not the answer while change from inside is. My opinion has changed on certain issues because I am prepared to listen and accept truths, all truths not just those that suit me. Where as as you said there as those that do not use truth as an argument but use beliefs almost like a religion as their cornerstone.

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    4. The way in which the prohibitionists have attempted to sidestep the union representatives of the dancers is particularly disgraceful, and demonstrates that they have no genuine interest in their wellbeing (irrespective of Anna van Heeswijk's belated adoption of 'house fees' as a buzz phrase).

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    5. The fact is that Object has lost all hope of coming off on top when discussing clubs. The adoption of a new buzz word acts as though they are fighting for the dancers... by taking their jobs away. Makes no sense to me but I am sure they can make up reasons.

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  2. Then of course, there's the little matter of name-calling by Object supporters protesting outside Spearmint Rhino in Tottenham Court Road recently:

    http://sexandcensorship.org/2014/10/letter-object-regarding-rape-allegations/

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    1. Debating their cronies either on facebook or on my favourite mumsnet (till I got banned) I have had names cast at me. In particular I have been accused of buying women as though I am some sort of slaver or that I believe in incest with the what about your mum, wife or daughter catcalls. Certain had that in the past. Can't every remember a direct accusation of rape but certainly they have come close in the past.

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    2. That simply demonstrates the chimp level at which such activists often operate. It would be wonderful to finally see one or more of them sued for their more defamatory smears!

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    3. They believe they are safe because the stigma attached to the industry. How many of us would be prepared to end up in court and named in public? A year ago I wouldn't but now I am of the opinion cowards need to be challenged and if that means my real world details come out so be it.

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    4. Oh, the irony (which is doubtless lost on them) of such reliance on social stigma, when they claim to be acting in the interests of the dancers! A further demonstration of the conservatism at the heart of 'radical feminism', as embodied by organisations such as Object Now and UK Feminista.

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  3. I have just downloaded iStripper, so I can have the best virtual strippers get naked on my desktop.

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